The Diana K. Carey Art Gallery

The Diana Carey Gallery at SCMS features local artists on rotating, quarterly basis at the Center for Chamber Music.

Featured Artist

My art career started at the age of 9, beginning with a show of Vincent Van Gogh’s paintings at the Guggenheim Museum in New York. From that exhibit, I knew I was seeing something special and became very curious and inspired by Van Gogh’s work. It was many years later the seed began to germinate. I was exposed again in my French class to the French Impressionists, as well as the French composer Berlioz in his Symphony Fantastique.

Beginning in college, my love for the arts flourished as I enrolled in as many art history and studio art classes as I could. While studying abroad in London (1979), I modeled in clay and painted in oils. I was terrible at both. Upon returning my senior year, I started carving plaster and fell in love with this new medium.

Upon graduating from college, I spent a year carving stone with a group women sculptors in Greenwich CT. We called ourselves the Uncommon Chiselers. We had a lot of fun working together in studio and had numerous shows in town.

In ‘82 I married and moved to Oregon. When my husband finished law school, we moved to Seattle to start a family. I was a stay-at-home Mom and carved in my spare time. I carved for about 25 years and have nearly 40 stones and plaster pieces in my personal collection. In 1990, I took my family to Carrara Italy for 3 weeks, working alongside other sculptors from Italy. It was an eye-opening experience. Across the courtyard from our studio was a life size “David” by Michelangelo being replicated by an industrial studio. My little 80-pound rock of marble seemed very insignificant by comparison. My poor husband carried my stone carving home on the plane, pretending it was light! I had my hands full with two toddlers.

When we became empty nesters, I put the hammer and chisel away and began taking classes in Seattle at Pratt Art School. I made some new friends in studio, and we met monthly to critique our work. I had found what I was looking for in Printmaking; an endless array of techniques and ways to express myself in color.

The process I use in this Series is called Shellac Plate. Basically, I use mat board and shellac it 3 times. Once dry, I apply the ink with a brayer (roller) to the surface of the plate. Paper is placed over the plate, and then run through a press to create the print. I also use a palette knife sometimes to add ink by hand.

 

1980: Graduated from Wheaton College Cum Laude with an Art degree in sculpture
1980-81: Carved stone with Uncommon Chiselers in Greenwich CT and showed our work locally in galleries.
1982: Married and moved to Eugene Oregon, and then to Seattle
1984: First child was born in Seattle
1987: Second child was born in Seattle
1990: Spent 3 weeks in Carrara Italy carving marble
1991: Moved to Bainbridge Island
1980 – 2009 Continued to carve stone (plaster, alabaster, marble, and soap stone).
1992 – present: continue to show both my sculptures and my printmaking locally on Bainbridge Island and Seattle. I have shown work at Grace Church, BI Library, Blackbird Bakery, BARN Bainbridge, and Virginia Mason Clinic. I have also shown my art at Pratt Art School.
2009 Began taking Classes at Pratt in sculpture, text art, collage and printmaking.
2010 – present: continue to practice and hone my printmaking skills by taking classes and teaching at the BARN.

 

The meaning behind the Pythagorean Theorem series:

The series on display at SCMS is based on the geometric formula of the Pythagorean Theorem: a2 + B2 = c2. The idea was presented to me by my son, Trubee, who has a Phd in Mathematics and has taught for many years at the University of Colorado in Boulder. He designed an image (as seen on the display wall with an explanation of theorem) using a cube broken up into triangles, squares, and rectangles to illustrate the Theorem. This idea fascinated me because the fixed design allowed me to have infinite choices about how to represent each square, and to endlessly explore color relationships, textures, and special complexities to achieve harmonic relationships and balance.

The Pythagorean Theorem:

 

The Pythagorean Theorem is one of the most iconic and ubiquitous results in mathematics. It is used by elementary students when they are first learning about shapes, and the most advanced mathematicians, engineers, and physicists. The date of the first proof is uncertain but dates back many centuries — it remains unclear if the Greek philosopher Pythagoras was the first to discover the geometric relationship. There is evidence that the discovery pre-dates him, but as is sometimes the case in math, the name of a result is not always the person who first discovered it.

There are numerous proofs of this important theorem which states that the sum of the squares of the sides of a right triangle equals the square of the hypotenuse. The diagram depicted above is called a rearrangement proof. By rearranging the yellow and green triangles, one can see that the sum of the areas of the left blue squares must be the same as the area of the blue square on the right. No blue area has been gained or lost by moving around the triangles. This is the Pythagorean Theorem displayed geometrically.

The artwork in this show is a play on this rearrangement proof inspired by the following iPad doodle that my son (who has a math PhD) sent me a few years ago.

The Art

Pythagorean Theorem - Part 1

Materials: Oil-Based Printmaking Inks

Size: 18” x 18”

Price: $600

Pythagorean Theorem - Part 2

Materials: Oil-Based Printmaking Inks

Size: 18” x 18”

Price: $600

Pythagorean Theorem - Part 3

Materials: Oil-Based Printmaking Inks

Size: 18” x 18”

Price: $600

Pythagorean Theorem - Part 4

Materials: Oil-Based Printmaking Inks

Size: 18” x 18”

Price: $600

Pythagorean Theorem - Part 5

Materials: Oil-Based Printmaking Inks

Size: 18” x 18”

Price: $600

Pythagorean Theorem - Part 6

Materials: Oil-Based Printmaking Inks

Size: 18” x 18”

Price: $600

Pythagorean Theorem - Part 7

Materials: Oil-Based Printmaking Inks

Size: 18” x 18”

Price: $600

Pythagorean Theorem - Part 8

Materials: Oil-Based Printmaking Inks

Size: 18” x 18”

Price: $600

Pythagorean Theorem - Part 9

Materials: Oil-Based Printmaking Inks

Size: 18” x 18”

Price: $600

Pythagorean Theorem - Part 10

Materials: Oil-Based Printmaking Inks

Size: 18” x 18”

Price: $600